Category Archives: Jackie King

Lesson #2

Greetings fellow Indabians! I hope you’re all well. Sorry
for getting back to you so late but we had the passing away of a close family
member, which sort of slowed down our direction for a minute. Hope you are well
and have had some fun and success with things we touched on last time.
Practicing dynamics not only makes me a better player, but also causes me to
hear the various volumes more in everything.

I’m a real lover of brain exercises, especially lately, and
here are a couple of them that I would like to share.

Two things that make music, and almost everything else, so
exciting, interesting, and great are anticipation and organization. Think about
it. Almost everything we do requires anticipation and organization of the
execution of that anticipation.

For example, let’s say we’re going to go out the door of a
room, and there is a chair between the door and us. There are anywhere from one
to a thousand ways to get from where we are to the door. We can walk around the
left of the chair, the right side of the chair; we can stand on the chair and
step down on the other side. We could jump over the chair. We could move the
chair to any number of places. Or we could crawl under the chair, and on and on
and on. Any one of these ways requires anticipation. We then organize how we’re
going to execute that anticipation.

The same is exactly true in playing music except we are
anticipating and organizing our hand and finger moves instead of our body
moves. This is true whether we are moving to the next chord, the next note, or
the next rhythm. We anticipate how we’re going to get there and what we play is
the organization of the execution of the anticipation. We do this all the time,
often even without realizing it!

Let’s play some exercises that will really develop the brain
and cause you to play faster and better.

We are going to add rhythm to the dynamic exercises we did
before. Here’s how:

 

(1.)          Play a scale, for example C Major, two octaves: C, D,
E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C.

 

(2.)          Use two eighth notes on the first beat and a quarter
note on the second, third, and fourth beats. In other words C and D are played
as eighth notes on the first beat, then E is played on the second beat, F is
played on the third beat, and G is played on the fourth beat. E, F, and G are
quarter notes.

 

(3.)          Now, move the eighth notes forward one beat each
measure. This means that on the first go round the first beat holds two eighth
notes. The second go round the second beat holds the two eighth notes. The
third go round the third beat holds the two eighth notes. The fourth go round
the fourth beat holds the two eighth notes. The three beats in each exercise
that don’t hold the eighth notes hold the quarter notes.

 

(4.)          Keep going, moving the two eighth notes forward one
beat every measure, and then start backwards. Next, mix up the notes to create
different melodies. For example:

E, G-F (eighth notes), E, C, D-E
(eighth notes), F, E, and D. Then go from two eighth notes to an eighth note
triplet.

 

(5.)          Organize which notes you’re going to play louder or
softer. Could be just one note – then pick another note to change the dynamics
on. Do this for at least twenty minutes a day and you’ll discover that your
brain and your playing are getting faster and more variable. Write a song, or
some exercise using different scales or a chromatic scale.

 

 

Let me know what and how you’re doing and I’ll do the same.
If you don’t understand this or have any questions, let me know at any time and
we’ll talk about it. Hope to hear from you soon!

 

Jackie

 

 

 

 

 


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Lesson #1

Hi to all my Indaba friends and family! Finally getting back
to you all (or ya’ll since I’m a native Texan).  Once again let me say how happy I am to be a part of the
Indaba community and to be sharing our creative projects and efforts together.

One of the things that I have found to be such an important
part of technique and composing music is dynamics. Dynamics are a major part of
music that are neglected by students (which we always are regardless of our
degree of expertise and experience).

There are two things I have always found to be true which my
first and most important teacher told me. The first is to always try to be
around at least one person who is either a better musician than you or at least
as good. The second is to remember you can always learn something from
everyone, regardless of how well or poorly you think they play. Through the
years I have found this to be consistently true.

Somebody will say or play something that you think he or she
really should not be able to say or do according to the level of player you
think he or she is. Wow! I have learned a lot of licks, etcetera, that way.

Getting back to dynamics… Dynamics are the volume and
articulation and energy used to play a note or notes. What it actually means is
energy control.

Control of energy is absolutely necessary to a great
technique. Here are some ways to practice dynamics:

 

·      Take a scale, let’s say a C major scale, and
play the first two notes: C and D. Then add a note each time you play it: C,D,E
- then C,D,E,F – then C,D,E,F,G – and so on until you complete the scale.
Change the volume of each note each time you play it.

·      Play the entire scale many times gradually
lowering the volume every time you play it, making sure you keep the same
tempo.

·      Change the volume of one note in the scale
without stopping.                  

     Example 1: C,D,E,F,G(forte),A,B,C. Example 2: C,D,E (forte), F,G
(piano), A,B,C

·      Skip intervals and select notes to change the
volume on, creating your own melody with the scale. Example:
C,B(forte),A,D(forte),G(piano),F,E

·      Increase or decrease the tempo and, using two
octaves create your own melodies. Example: E,B,G,F(forte),F(piano),E,A,

D (8va),B,C,F,D,E

·      Listen and experiment with different tones you
can create with a pick or your fingers.

·      Be sure the same clarity and articulation is
within your control, regardless of the tempo or volume.

 

I’ll be looking for some feedback or ideas from you. Talk to
you soon.

 

Jackie King

 


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Lesson Blog 1

Hi to all my Indaba friends and family! Finally getting back
to you all (or ya’ll since I’m a native Texan).  Once again let me say how happy I am to be a part of the
Indaba community and to be sharing our creative projects and efforts together.

One of the things that I have found to be such an important
part of technique and composing music is dynamics. Dynamics are a major part of
music that are neglected by students (which we always are regardless of our
degree of expertise and experience).

There are two things I have always found to be true which my
first and most important teacher told me. The first is to always try to be
around at least one person who is either a better musician than you or at least
as good. The second is to remember you can always learn something from
everyone, regardless of how well or poorly you think they play. Through the
years I have found this to be consistently true.

Somebody will say or play something that you think he or she
really should not be able to say or do according to the level of player you
think he or she is. Wow! I have learned a lot of licks, etcetera, that way.

Getting back to dynamics… Dynamics are the volume and
articulation and energy used to play a note or notes. What it actually means is
energy control.

Control of energy is absolutely necessary to a great
technique. Here are some ways to practice dynamics:

 

·      Take a scale, let’s say a C major scale, and
play the first two notes: C and D. Then add a note each time you play it: C,D,E
- then C,D,E,F – then C,D,E,F,G – and so on until you complete the scale.
Change the volume of each note each time you play it.

·      Play the entire scale many times gradually
lowering the volume every time you play it, making sure you keep the same
tempo.

·      Change the volume of one note in the scale
without stopping.                   Example 1: C,D,E,F,G(forte),A,B,C. Example 2: C,D,E (forte), F,G
(piano), A,B,C

·      Skip intervals and select notes to change the
volume on, creating your own melody with the scale. Example:
C,B(forte),A,D(forte),G(piano),F,E

·      Increase or decrease the tempo and, using two
octaves create your own melodies. Example: E,B,G,F(forte),F(piano),E,A,

D (8va),B,C,F,D,E

·      Listen and experiment with different tones you
can create with a pick or your fingers.

·      Be sure the same clarity and articulation is
within your control, regardless of the tempo or volume.

 

I’ll be looking for some feedback or ideas from you. Talk to
you soon.

 

Jackie King

Posted in Artists in Residence, Jackie King | 1 Comment

Lesson Blog 1

Hi to all my Indaba friends and family! Finally getting back
to you all (or ya’ll since I’m a native Texan).  Once again let me say how happy I am to be a part of the
Indaba community and to be sharing our creative projects and efforts together.

One of the things that I have found to be such an important
part of technique and composing music is dynamics. Dynamics are a major part of
music that are neglected by students (which we always are regardless of our
degree of expertise and experience).

There are two things I have always found to be true which my
first and most important teacher told me. The first is to always try to be
around at least one person who is either a better musician than you or at least
as good. The second is to remember you can always learn something from
everyone, regardless of how well or poorly you think they play. Through the
years I have found this to be consistently true.

Somebody will say or play something that you think he or she
really should not be able to say or do according to the level of player you
think he or she is. Wow! I have learned a lot of licks, etcetera, that way.

Getting back to dynamics… Dynamics are the volume and
articulation and energy used to play a note or notes. What it actually means is
energy control. Control of energy is absolutely necessary to a great
technique. Here are some ways to practice dynamics:

            ·      Take a scale, let’s say a C major scale, and
play the first two notes: C and D. Then add a note each time you play it: C,D,E
- then C,D,E,F – then                       C,D,E,F,G – and so on until you complete the scale.
Change the volume of each note each time you play it.

·      Play the entire scale many times gradually
lowering the volume every time you play it, making sure you keep the same
tempo.

·      Change the volume of one note in the scale
without stopping. Example 1: C,D,E,F,G(forte),A,B,C. Example 2: C,D,E (forte), F,G
(piano), A,B,C

·      Skip intervals and select notes to change the
volume on, creating your own melody with the scale. Example: C,B(forte),A,D(forte),G(piano),F,E

·      Increase or decrease the tempo and, using two
octaves create your own melodies. Example: E,B,G,F(forte),F(piano),E,A,D (8va),B,C,F,D,E

·      Listen and experiment with different tones you
can create with a pick or your fingers.

·      Be sure the same clarity and articulation is
within your control, regardless of the tempo or volume.

 I’ll be looking for some feedback or ideas from you. Talk to
you soon.

 

Jackie King

 

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Introduction

I want to begin with a
warm hello and thank you to the entire Indaba staff and community for the honor
of being an A.I.R. I’m excited to be a part of the Indaba organization and to
offer with care my experience, knowledge and life’s work to each one of you.

My name is Jackie King and I have always – and continue – to span the world through land, sea, air,
and space (LOL) sharing every atom of information I can about every area of
music, and the guitar in particular.

I continue to be, as I
have for many years, lucky and blessed with knowing, studying, performing, and
working with great artists, musicians, composers, and teachers – and am looking
forward to sharing my knowledge and ideas with you all.

You will be accessing
video, audio, written word, tablature and notation, and other media from Indaba
and myself concerning topics from technique, improvising, styles, composition,
and recording, to music career planning, business, publishing, promotion, and
marketing. And for you guitar players, from the very beginners to the most
advanced, we’ll cover technique and styles appropriate to every level.

Please look at me as
someone you already know and as a friend. Feel free to discuss any topics or
ideas – general and basic, or detailed and advanced – and again I will be
offering as much as possible of my experience and knowledge.

But it’s not just my
tutorials I am excited about, although I do have a passion for teaching. My
residency with Indaba is also so exciting to me because I will be a part of
participating with this family in the amazing opportunity to create music
together worldwide. I haven’t seen the opportunity to do this type of
simultaneous musical creation without geographical boundaries anywhere else
except through Indaba.

Thank you Indaba and friends!

 

Sincerely,

 

Jackie King

 

P.S. I would like to
mention that I am very excited about a new website that is being recreated for
me. It will include live, one-on-one audio-visual lessons, many new areas of
free downloadable music, video, audio and other media. You will continue to be
informed about this as our relationship unfolds.

 


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